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variables_and_constants [2011/12/16 20:50]
thomaslocke
variables_and_constants [2013/02/21 08:31] (current)
thomaslocke [Variables]
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   Variable_Name : Variable_Type := Variable_Value   Variable_Name : Variable_Type := Variable_Value
  
-Lets try it with some real Ada variables. As seen above, a variable in Ada **must** be declared as pointing to a specific //type// of data:+Let'​s ​try it with some real Ada variables. As seen above, a variable in Ada **must** be declared as pointing to a specific //type// of data:
  
 <code ada> <code ada>
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-Notice the homegrown //Colors// type. First we declare the new type, and then we declare the //Color// variable the of that type. This is one of the biggest strengths of Ada: The ability to declare your own types and subtypes. More can be on this subject in the [[types and subtypes]] article. ​+Notice the homegrown //Colors// type. First we declare the new type, and then we declare the //Color// variable the of that type. This is one of the biggest strengths of Ada: The ability to declare your own types and subtypes. More can be found on this subject in the [[types and subtypes]] article. ​
  
-Now, lets try and use the above declared variables in an actual program:+Now, let'​s ​try and use the above declared variables in an actual program:
  
 <code ada> <code ada>
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 Constants are an important tool to help make your programs more reliable and maintainable. A constant is, just like a variable, a reference to a specific //type// of data, but where they differ from variables is in their constant nature. Variables vary, constants are constant. When declared and initialized,​ the data they reference is static and can no longer be altered. If you try to alter a constant, the compiler will complain, loudly. Constants are an important tool to help make your programs more reliable and maintainable. A constant is, just like a variable, a reference to a specific //type// of data, but where they differ from variables is in their constant nature. Variables vary, constants are constant. When declared and initialized,​ the data they reference is static and can no longer be altered. If you try to alter a constant, the compiler will complain, loudly.
  
-Lets see how we declare and initialize a constant:+Let'​s ​see how we declare and initialize a constant:
  
 <code ada> <code ada>
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 ====  Scope  ==== ====  Scope  ====
-Finally ​lets take a short look at variable scope in regards to blocks. When and where are they visible? This is perhaps best understood by a simple program:+Finally ​let'​s ​take a short look at variable scope in regards to blocks. When and where are they visible? This is perhaps best understood by a simple program:
  
 <code ada> <code ada>

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